Implementation and Lessons Learned from an Undergraduate Special Interest Group in Information Assurance

Author:
Gregory Conti, Daniel Ragsdale, Scott Lathrop, Christopher Gates
File Size:
200.05 kB
Date:
01 July 2004
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1278 x

This paper describes the methodology, implementation and results from the formation and execution of an undergraduate information assurance student group. In February 2001, our institution formed a student chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group for Security, Audit and Control (ACM-SIGSAC) due to extensive interest by the student body in computer security and information assurance, as well as an awareness of the critical need by the faculty. This was the first information assurance student chapter formed out of the more than 600 ACM student organizations worldwide. The chapter was formed with an interdisciplinary approach in order to include a larger portion of the student body and thus influence a larger audience. This approach proved successful. Over the past three years, the group has grown from an idea to a vibrant organization of approximately 600 students. We believe that we have struck a chord with the students that merits examination. The primary goal of this paper is to provide a descriptive resource to educators who wish to implement a student information assurance group. It includes the purpose and methodology behind the formation of the group, our successes and failures, our lessons learned, and potential future directions.

Implementation and Lessons Learned from an Undergraduate Special Interest Group in Information Assurance